2017 in Music.

Just as sure as the year is coming to an end, I’m starting to pump out my annual summary posts. First up is my 2017 in music.

Unlike last year, our friends at Spotify have managed to get a recap up this year: Your 2017 Wrapped. This year’s edition is pretty shitty, to be honest, but it contains some of the basic information you’d except from a company that knows everything about your listening habist. Another music service, Last.fm, provided an awesome summary feature last year that showed a lot more fine grained, and interesting data in their annual summaries. Unfortunately, they won’t be releasing the 2017 version until January 2018. It makes a lot of sense in terms of data availability, but doesn’t help me much since I’m writing my own summary now.

So we’ll have to make do with Spotify’s half-arsed effort. Here’s my 2017 in music according to Spotify:

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Thank You, SomaFM.

When there was nothing good to listen to on the radio, Rusty Hodge decided to create his own radio station. So begins the story of SomaFM.

In 2001, I was hard at work on my college thesis. Together with three other students1, I was working on “Project Magoria”, a tick-based, browser-based, online game. It was influenced by Planetarion, but set in medieval times. Although the end result wasn’t amazing, it gave us our first real-world experience with JSP, Linux, Java, SQL, and MySQL.

The thesis also gave me my first real-world experience with trying to get anything done in an open office space. Those of you who work in an open office space on a regular basis, and have a profession that requires you to focus on a task from time to time, know what kind of amazingly stupid idea an open office space is in that context. Numerous studies have shown that the open office space is terrible for people who need to focus. And still many people insist that it’s the right way to work for everyone. My escape in 2001 became to slap on a pair of headphones, and listen to music, preferably electronica. And my main source of mind expanding electronica quickly became the recently launched online radio channel SomaFM.

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December One-liners: Programming Special!

Here are the new one-liners for December. This time it’s programming special, with a few sprinkles of less nerdy wisdom. Most of the quotes below are collected from the Twitter account Programming Wisdom. They’re not exactly haha-funny, but if you’re a programmer they should make you think. Enjoy!

  • “It’s all talk until the code runs.” – Ward Cunningham
  • “In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But, in practice, there is.” – Jan L.A van de Snepscheut
  • I’ve got an idea for a really scary Halloween costume. How do I dress up as “The World Right Now”?
  • “What one programmer can do in one month, two programmers can do in two months.” – Fred Brooks
  • “Good software, like good wine, takes time.” – Joel Spolsky
  • “Debugging is like being the detective in a crime movie where you are also the murderer.” – Filipe Fortes
  • Trying again to persuade my wife to participate in a twosome.
  • “We build our computer systems the way we build our cities: over time, without a plan, on top of ruins.” – Ellen Ullman
  • “Think about it; and think about it carefully. Nothing happens in our society without software. Nothing.” – Robert “Uncle Bob Martin
  • “I ran a half marathon” sounds so much better than “I quit halfway through a marathon”.
  • “A language that doesn’t affect the way you think about programming is not worth knowing.” – Alan J. Perlis
  • “Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” – Harold Abelson & Gerald Jay Sussman
  • “Debugging time increases as a square of the program’s size.” – Chris Wenham
  • “One of the best programming skills you can have is knowing when to walk away for awhile.” – Oscar Godson
  • The trick to really enjoying someone’s company is to not spend a lot of time with them.
  • “The strength of JavaScript is that you can do anything. The weakness is that you will.” – Reg Braithwaite
  • “The best programs are the ones written when the programmer is supposed to be working on something else.” – Melinda Varian
  • “A primary cause of complexity is that software vendors uncritically adopt almost any feature that users want.”- Niklaus Wirth
  • “Every great developer you know got there by solving problems they were unqualified to solve until they actually did it.” – Patrick McKenzie
  • Life doesn’t hand me lemons, it fires them at me rapidly from a lemon cannon.
  • “The next best thing to having good ideas is recognizing good ideas from your users. Sometimes the latter is better.” – Eric Raymond
  • “Looking at code you wrote more than two weeks ago is like looking at code you are seeing for the first time.”– Dan Hurvitz
  • Having nutrition information on a bag of Cheetos is like having dating tips on a box of Crocs.

“Ringworld” by Larry Niven.

Larry Niven’s Ringworld is a piece of classic science fiction that everyone interested in the genre should read. Here’s my review.

The year is 2850 AD. Louis Wu is celebrating his 200th birthday. To make the day last as long as possible, Louis moves west1 through transfer booths, when one of them suddenly malfunctions. He finds himself in a hotel room with a Pierson’s puppeteer, a peculiar-looking, two-headed alien. The puppeteer has an offer for Louis, and it’s an offer he can’t refuse.

The puppeteer propose that Louis joins him, and two additional, unnamed, crew members on a journey to an undisclosed location. Louis reward, should ha accept the mission, will be access to a space ship with quantum II hyperspace shunt engines. These engines, developed by the puppeteers, will cut travel time through space to a fraction of what it currently is. Any race with access to the engines would find themselves in a superior position compared to races that only have access to conventional, hyperspace shunt engines.

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How To Install LEDE on a Linksys WRT1900ACS.

This post will guide you through a LEDE Linksys WRT1900ACS installation. It’ll show you how to install LEDE on a WRT1900ACS fresh out of the box.

Understand this: Always flash firmware using a wired connection, never via WiFi. Failure to adhere to this substantially increase the probability you will brick your router. I’ve only included instructions for flashing via an Ethernet below. If you chose to use a wireless connection instead, you’re on your own.
Warning: Flashing third party firmware will void your warranty. I will not be held responsible if anything goes wrong. Flashing a device’s firmware is always a risky operation, especially when you’re dealing with custom, unofficial firmware. By following this amateurish guide you understand that you might end up with a brick – a useless piece of hardware.

Flashing a router with third party firmware isn’t a trivial thing to do, even with the help of this step-by-step guide. Make sure you read through the entire guide at least twice before you start so you get an overview of the steps.

With that out of the way, let’s get started.

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