John Wick: Chapter 2.

What is this? A review of a movie that’s actually somewhat topical, and not just one that was released a long time ago1? Scandalous! Earlier this week, me and Hans Olav had some Indian food, and went to see John Wick: Chapter 2.

As the “Chapter 2” part of the movie title implies, this is a sequel. The first John Wick movie premiered in 2014, and it saw generally favorable reviews across the board. If you haven’t watched the first movie, fear not. That’s not important to be able to understand the plot in Chapter 2. There is no deep meta-story anywhere that you need to be aware of to enjoy this second chapter. Here’s all you need to know: John Wick is a hitman with a reputation for getting his mark. He wanted to retire, but a bad man forced him back into the game. Now that bad man has to die.

Aaand, action! Lots and lots of it. If you need to watch something that won’t challenge you intellectually on any level, John Wick: Chapter 2 is absolutely perfect. You’ll get 122 minutes of pretty much non-stop action, and very, very little chit-chat. This makes the movie perfect for Keanu Reeves, who has the acting skills of a log. But he is absolutely superb as John Wick. Screenwriter Derek Kolstad has written a part that fits Reeves like a glove, and his lines are rarely longer than five words.

Interestingly, though, the scene where Reeves manages to sound reasonable believable, is during the longest verbal exchange of the movie. So maybe Reeves is actually an acting genius that my feeble mind doesn’t understand? Not unlikely.

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“Animal Farm” by George Orwell.

The animals of Manor Farm are tired of living under the tyranny of the farm’s owner, Mr. Jones. One evening, the boar Old Major summons the animals of the farm to a meeting. He tells them the story of a wonderful world where farms are run by the animals themselves. Old Major also teaches them a revolutionary song called “Beasts of England“. With hope for a better life for all the animals, they revolt, and drive Mr. Jones away from the farm. From that day onward, the farm is known as “Animal Farm”. It will be run by the animals, which will all be considered equal.

George Orwell wrote Animal Farm during World War II. Being a not-so-subtle satire about the Russian revolution, the Soviet Union, and Stalin’s expulsion of Trotsky, Orwell had a hard time getting it published. Since the Soviet Union sided with the Allied powers during the war, the manuscript was initially rejected by a number of British and American publishers. It was not until 1945, only weeks before the war was officially over, that the book was published. It then became a commercial success, partly to changing international relations, and the Cold War.

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I Love You, Revo SuperConnect!

Over the years I’ve reviewed a lot of stuff. It’s been mostly movies, books, and computer games, but also the occasional piece of hardware. My lowest ever score of exactly 0 was awarded to a pair of Scullcandy Uprock headphones. They are the worst piece of shit headphones ever made. Now the time has come to have a look at what might be the best piece of hardware ever made: The Revo SuperConnect.

I’m in charge of making dinner for the family, and thus spend some time in the kitchen. The radio is usually on, but the selection of radio stations in Norway isn’t exactly massive. The internet, however, has an almost endless collection of radio stations covering every imaginary genre. To take advantage of this massive smörgåsbord of beautiful audio waves, I started looking for an internet radio a while ago. The Logitech Squeezebox seemed like a good option, but the product was discontinued in 2012.

Then I came across the Revo SuperConnect. Designed and developed by the Scottish company Revo, the SuperConnect is a radio that combines an impressive range of features and connectivity options into a stunning looking hardware package.

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Guardians of the Galaxy.

I’m sorry. I’ll probably never be a good source for relevant reviews. My movie reviews are usually of old releases, and this rushed piece on Guardians of the Galaxy is no exception. I lag far, far behind on what should be considered elementary movies to watch for a science-fiction fan, but this weekend I finally got the chance to see what all the fuzz about the Guardians was about.

Guardians of the Galaxy is a science fiction comedy set in 2014. You might try to argue that 2014 doesn’t sound very science fiction. But among the movie’s many characters, you’ll find a green woman (Gamora), a walking tree (Groot), and a talking racoon (Rocket). There are also a lot of space ships and laser guns, so it all falls well inside the boundaries of the genre we all love.

Peter Quill, who was abducted from Earth back in 1988, now keeps himself busy as a Ravager. During one of his raids, he steals a mysterious orb. Not surprisingly, the orb contains one of the most powerful forces in the universe, capable of destroying entire planets in a matter of seconds. Naturally, this makes the orb interesting for some of the more shady characters in the galaxy.

When the orb falls into the hands of one of the shadiest of them all, Ronan the Accuser, the Guardians have to set aside their differences to safe the orb, themselves, and the entire galaxy.

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Homeworld Remastered.

In 1999, Vancouver-based developer Relic Entertainment released their first game. The game was Homeworld, a real time strategy game set in space. For its time, Homeworld was a visual feast. Beautiful, 3D modeled space ships in combat against glorious backdrops of star fields and nebulas. In 2015, 16 years after the release of the original game, Gearbox Software released Homeworld Remastered, with both upgrades visuals and a refined user interface. But does Homeworld stand the test of time?

Both critics and players rejoiced when the original Homeworld was released. Even I wrote a preview of sorts. But the visuals wasn’t the only aspect that made the game stand out. Homeworld came with an intricate, original backstory, a feature that wasn’t exactly in abundance among the strategy games released at the time.

An ancient space ship is discovered buried in the sand at the dessert planet Kharak. It contains a stone map showing Kharak and another planet across the galaxy labelled “Higara” – home. The clans of Kharak unite to build a giant mothership that will carry 600,000 people on the long journey to Higara to reclaim their home planet. But during a final calibration test of the mothership’s hyperdrive things go bad. It turns out that strong forces in the universe are prepared to do whatever it takes to keep the Higarans from leaving Kharak, and start the journey back home.

Homeworld Remastered and its beautiful space combat.

Homeworld Remastered and its beautiful space combat.

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