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The Midnight Live in Oslo (Again)

My favorite synthwave band, The Midnight, is currently on their second European tour of 2019. I went to see them again in Oslo.

When The Midnight visited Oslo back in February, they held a helluva show. Together with the saxophone player the band had brought with them on tour, Tyler Lyle and Tim McEwan immediately enthralled the audience.

Earlier this week, The Midnight returned to Oslo. Everything was bigger this time. The venue was bigger, the tour bus was bigger, and the lights were brighter. Tyler and Tim were joined on stage by two other musicians; a guitarist and a saxophone/backup synth player.

This time, the gig got off to a slow start, and the quartet on stage used about two thirds of the show to get the audience really going. Tyler seemed somewhat unmotivated, to be honest, and didn’t quite hit the vocals in the same way as he did back in February.

The Midnight has a lot of slow, downbeat songs, in particular from their most recent album, Kids. For whatever reason, Tyler and Tim decided to start the concert with two downbeat songs, which might not have been the best choice.

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The KeePassXC User Guide

Here’s a basic KeePassXC user guide where you’ll learn how to store and use your first super-secure password.

If you haven’t done so already, please install KeePassXC on your computer. You can do this by following my guide to installing KeePassXC on Windows 10. When that is done, return here.

KeePassXC might look a bit daunting at first sight, but there is no need to worry. To use KeePassXC as a basic password manager only requires basic knowledge of the application. And when you’ve finished reading through this KeePassXC user guide, you’ll have the knowledge you need.

Without further ado, let’s get cracking!

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Life After Navdy

Navdy was a brilliant piece of hardware. Unfortunately, the company has gone belly up, and now my Navdy is just a very expensive paper weight. Or is it?

Back in 2014, I pre-ordered a Navdy unit, an automotive head-up-display (HUD). We owned a Škoda Superb at the time1, and while it was a great car overall, it lacked a lot in the user interface and navigation department.

As with most cars, you had to take your eyes off the road to get any information about the car. The Navdy HUD solved this by projecting everything you needed to know in your line-of-sight. The brilliant device connected to the car via the OBD II port, and used that information to show about how the vehicle was doing. With Navdy, there was no need to move your attention from the road to know how fast you were driving, or how much fuel was in the tank.

Navdy also connected to your smartphone via Bluetooth. This opened up a wide range of features compared to what Škoda, and most other car manufacturers, provided at the time. Navdy provided turn-by-turn navigation using Google Maps, a smooth Spotify integration, phone notifications and more.

With support for both hand gestures and voice commands, operating Navdy was a breeze. Skipping to the next Spotify song was done by simply swiping your hand to the right.

Navdy was a genius piece of high quality hardware and software. Unfortunately, Navdy didn’t manage to bring in enough money to keep the company afloat, and in December 2017 it was bankrupt.

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On the Road Again With Euro Truck Simulator 2

Two years after my Euro Truck Simulator 2 review, it’s time to revisit the game to see how it holds up. Spoiler alert: It only got better.

7 years after its release, Czech developer SCS Software‘s trucking simulator is as popular as it ever was. As of right now – just past 6 O’clock on a Sunday morning CET – more than seven thousand people are playing Euro Truck Simulator 2 (ETS2) on Steam. It’s among the highly rated games on the platform, with a 96% approval rating on its 150 000 reviews.

I wrote a very favorable review of the game two years ago, and have continued to play it since. ETS2 is now my third most played game on Steam, with over 70 hours played.

But what makes a seemingly exceedingly boring thing as hauling virtual cargo across Europe so popular? The way I see it, there are two main reasons for SCS’s success with ETS2.

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Delete Your Blizzard Account Today

As politics and gaming merge, gamers have to think hard about where they spend their money.

Back in the early days of the gaming industry, the games were developed by passionate developers who focused on the product. They wanted to make the best game possible, which often resulted in long working hours, physical and emotional exhaustion, and financial catastrophes.

Today, that have changed. Those small game developers have turned into multi-billion companies with thousands of employees. The primary driver is no longer make the greatest game ever, but rather how to squeeze as much money as possible out of their customers as possible.

Blizzard Entertainment is a great example of such a company. Founded in early 1991, the company had their breakout release with the genre-defining real time strategy game Warcraft: Orcs & Humans in 1994. The game was the first game in Blizzard’s popular Warcraft series. The company went on to create several other hugely successful gaming franchises as well, like Diablo and StarCraft.

The Warcraft, Diablo, and StarCraft games brought in a lot of money, but the company’s first real money press was the World of Warcraft MMORPG. Launched in 2004, WoW became the most popular MMORPG to date, and by 2017, the game had grossed over $9.23 billion in revenue.

Blizzard used to be a down-to-Earth company that focused on their games, and their customers. But now the company find itself at a crossroad where corporate greed and human ethics meet.

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