Vegard Skjefstad

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Tag: Computer Games (page 1 of 30)

Kickstarter: The Long Overdue

In the world of Kickstarter, you win some and you lose some. And you wait some.

I’m not pledging to support Kickstarter campaigns at the same rate as I once did. But I still throw a bit of money at the odd project. So far in 2019, I’ve supported two video games, Lunark and Space Haven, and a comic, the fifth issue of Dunce. The Dunce pledge is a bit out of character for me, my modus operandi is computer game pledges. But the autobiographic Dunce comic is created by a Norwegian artist, Jens K. Styve, and I’m all for supporting local talent. That the strip is quite entertaining also helps, of course. When I’m writing this, there is still a couple of weeks left of the Dunce campaign. So why don’t you go pledge yourself?

But I digress, as I often do. This post is not supposed to be about the campaigns I’ve supported recently. It’s about two projects I supported a long time ago.

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The Darkside Detective

Join The Darkside Detective, Francis McQueen, as he investigates the bizarre, the supernatural, and those missing cat cases that keep getting dropped on his desk.

The Darkside Detective is a point-and-click adventure game featuring detective Francis McQueen, and his sidekick, Officer Dooley. They are Twin Lakes PD’s underfunded Darkside Division, in charge of investigating all the strange things happening in the city. When transdimensional doorways open up, flesh-hungry tentacles rise out of the toilets, or gremlins are on the loose, the Darkside Division is not far away.

The Darkside Detective features 9 cases. The game was originally shipped with 6, and an additional 3 bonus cases have been added later – for free. The bonus cases are unlocked when you’ve solved the first 6 cases. They can also be unlocked if you do a little detective work yourself in the game’s menus. The cases are short and sweet, and each one will only take you an extended lunch break to finish. About 4 hours in, I’ve closed six of the nine cases. That’s pretty good value for money for the asking price of $12.99.

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The Turing Test

Is it possible uncover the hidden mysteries of Jupiter’s moon Europa, and not feel like a dumb-ass while doing it? This is my The Turing Test review.

The Turing Test is a first person puzzler that explores the phenomena of consciousness, and challenges the meaning of human intuition. The game is developed by British video game developer Bulkhead Interactive.

I kind of suck at puzzle games, and feel like an idiot every time I have to duckduck the solution, just to realize it was so simple. But when The Turing Test appeared on sale on Steam for NOK 28 (about $3) a while back, I decided to get it anyway.

The previous first person puzzler I finished was Valve’s 2011 title Portal 2. I thoroughly enjoyed that game, but not so much because of the puzzles. They aren’t bad, but the strength of Portal 2, at least in my view, is the captivating story unfolding as you work your way through the puzzles. How can one not be scarred for life by GLaDOS and all the broken promises of cake?

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Meditations

One morning in 2017, Rami Ismail played a short game that made him wish he had a new tiny game like it for every day of the year. That wish turned into Meditations.

Meditations will launch a new game every day, inspired by that day, and only on that day. There’s all sorts of games in there, from curious small puzzle games, and challenging little platformers, to personal games about life and loss and happiness and love and death – and everything.

I installed Meditations in early January, but I’ve only played three of the games. And they were, how should I put this, confusingly interesting? Today’s game, by Andrew Gleeson, is a good example. It’s a game without title, but the description is “for those who feel adrift in the endless void.”

For those who feel adrift in the endless void. The January 18th Meditations game by Andrew Gleeson.

It’s about flying through the endless void while you try to remember what keys to press. Or something like that. I don’t understand the game, but it sure is great for relaxing. Just like the other two Meditations games I’ve tried so far.

Put on Good Weather for an Airstrike‘s awesome Sleepy Music for the Tired Insomniac playlist, and you’re good to go.

Stellaris 2.2 with MegaCorp

Your favorite science-fiction RTS has received yet another major game mechanics overhaul, and a brand new expansion. Here’s my Stellaris MegaCorp review.

Stellaris was just updated to version 2.2. In the same breath, Paradox also released an accompanying expansion, MegaCorp. The expansion, as the name implies, gives you the opportunity to play as the CEO of a megacorporation, and it adds a new city world planet type, more megastructures, a couple of new ascension perks, and access to the galactic slave market.

The MegaCorp expansion goes hand in hand with the significant changes to the Stellaris economy model, and planetary management mechanics.

Stellaris MegaCorp launch trailer.
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