Vegard Skjefstad

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Tag: Computer Games (page 1 of 29)

Time

I’m getting myself into a time problem, and I’m not sure how to solve it.

So, yeah, as you know I’ve got a wife. And we have kids. I’ve also got a job. I need to sleep. And I’ve got hobbies: Running, gaming, writing posts for this site, and reading books.

I’m terrible at multitasking, but I’ve managed to combine some of these hobbies to a certain degree. I placed an old television set in front of the treadmill, and hooked it up with a Chromecast dongle. So now I cover some of my gaming needs by watching other people play games on YouTube or Twitch while I’m running.

I’ve also tried to combine gaming and writing by putting together quite a lot of computer game reviews over the years. This isn’t ideal, though, because the reviews often feels a bit forced, probably because I played the game just to write a review. What’s the fun in that? Playing the game should lead to writing the review, not the other way around.

The third multitasking-esque thing I do is reading books while I’m commuting. This actually works out very well. I’ve had the A Book A Month project going for about three years now, and it’s been a raging success. I don’t think I’ve ever read as many books as I do these days.

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Not Tonight

Brexit is a mess. Thankfully, the game about it is not. Here’s my Not Tonight review.

Papers, Please puts you behind the counter at a border crossing in the fictional dystopian Eastern Bloc-like country of Arstotzka. Oh, wait. Wrong game! This is Not Tonight, a paperwork-checking simulator set in a dystopian post-Brexit Britain. It’s the second game released in this genre, with Papers, Please being the genre-defining title1.

To say that Not Tonight is inspired by Lucas Pope‘s 2013 title is an understatement. At first glance, Not Tonight looks and plays like a game that could have been a Papers, Please sequel. The mechanics are more or less the same, and Not Tonight also resorts to the pixel art style we’ve come to associate with indie games. You play as Person of European Heritage #112, currently residing in Relocation Block B. In order to stay in post-Brexit Britain, you have to prove your worth in your designated role as bouncer. If you don’t contribute, you’ll be booted off the island.

Not Tonight: Because you don’t get enough of work at work.
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Building Springwood

While most gamers around the globe sat down to play Red Dead Redemption 2 last weekend, I opted for something else entirely on Saturday night.

Rockstar Games recently released their much anticipated Western-themed action-adventure game Red Dead Redemption 2. The game is only available for Xbox One and PlayStation 4, of which I have none. So getting it was never an option for me.

Instead, I took a dive into a very different title; Colossal Order’s Cities: Skylines. It’s a city-building game, much like the beloved SimCity. I am, of course, referring to the original Sim City, and not the disaster that was the 2013 remake.

Cities: Skylines has changed a lot since its release in 2015. Since my review the same year, it has received a massive amount of free updates and paid expansions. As of right now, I count no less than 19 available DLCs. I’ve picked up every single one of them on various sales, including the latest Industries expansions. And with all the DLCs installed there is so much you can do. So. Amazingly. Much.

So, on Saturday night, I poured myself a glass of Grant’s Family Reserve, and sat down to build the greatest city of all time!

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Black The Fall

Sand Sailor Studio’s dystopian puzzle game reminds me a lot of INSIDE, but does it also have some ideas of its own? Here’s my Black The Fall review.

Black The Fall is yet another one of those Kickstarter games I’ve thrown money at.  The campaign promised a “a sharp, modern action game set in a post-communistindustrial world.” Being a total sucker for any fictitious dystopian setting, I happily backed Bucharest-based Sand Sailor Studio‘s campaign.

Not long after the campaign ended, I received my Steam key. But I’ve stopped playing games that are in alpha, beta, Early Access, or similar stages of development. I spent way too much time doing that with Star Rules 2. Time is a scarce resource these days, so I’d rather play a finished product instead. Then, in July last year, Black The Fall was released. But for no particular reason, I didn’t play it then either.

It wasn’t until a week ago that I finally took the plunge, and booted the game for the first time.

Screenshot from Black The Fall.
Black The Fall by Sand Sailor Studio.
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Press Play On Tape

The Internet Archive’s free Commodore 64 games collection is open for business.

If you’ve heard of the Internet Archive, there’s a good chance it’s because of their Wayback Machine. Since 1996, it’s been slurping up every site it has come across on the internet. The sites are archived, and everyone can browse through historically accurate versions of all the archived webpages. Wonder what Google looked like in 1998, when it only did internet searches, and wasn’t evil? The Wayback Machine’s got you covered.

But the Internet Archive is more than just the Wayback Machine. A lot more. In addition to websites, the archive contains millions of videos, audio files, images, TV shows, eBooks, text, and a whole lot more. My favorite, though? The Internet Archive Software Collection.

The software collection has close to three hundred thousand files, covering every platform from MS-DOS to the Apple II. The real gems in the collection, however, are the games. You’ll find classic arcade games, and games for platforms like the ZX Spectrum, Atari 2600, Sega Genesis, Amstrad GX-4000, and many more.

Now, the Internet Archive has also started archiving games for the computer that broke the European home computer market wide open: The amazing Commodore 64.

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