The Second Tale of a Doomed Colony

It’s not over until everybody’s dead. Again. (Or: Let’s play RimWorld.)

Well over three years ago, I posted The Tale of a Doomed Colony. It’s a story set in your favorite base-building-survival-strategy-sandbox-game, RimWorld. The time has come to read through the diary of another colony administrator to discover a different tale from a RimWorld colony1.

These are our three unfortunate colonists:

Hansol “Alice” Lee is a 16 year old mute without social skills. She likes to stay up late, and has a way with animals.

Lidia Delacruz is a 52 years old former test subject turned body guard. Lidia’s social skills are non-existent, and she has creepy breathing. She excels in both shooting and melee, however, both skills that I’m sure will come in very handy. Lidia’s creepy breathing will probably make it hard for her to sneak up on anyone, though.

The third, and final colonist is Vladislav Delacruz. He is 64 years old, and suffers from severe Alzheimer’s. He also has a psychite addiction, which I’m sure will not become an issue… Vlad is quite the craftsman, so let’s hope we can keep both his Alzheimer’s and drug addiction at bay. Vlad is Lidia’s brother.

Masters of Doom

Few people have been as defining and influential for the gaming industry as the Masters of Doom, John Carmack and John Romero.

Both grew up in the 1970s, experiencing the golden age of arcade video games. Classic games like Space Invaders and Pac-Man was an important part of their childhoods. The Apple II was the inaugural home computer for both Carmack and Romero, and the first published games for both of them were Apple II titles.

The two Johns’ paths eventually crossed when they met at Softdisk in 1989. It was a match made in heaven, and both were integral to the company’s success with their contributions to the Big Blue Disk magazine. Carmack, a programming and computer graphics genius – described as “a brain on legs” – and Romero, brilliant at both programming and game design.

At Softdisk, Romero and Carmack met Tom Hall and Adrian Carmack (not related to John). Tom worked at the company as a programmer and game designer, while Adrian’s primary role was as an artist. In early 1991, the four of them left Softdisk, and founded Id Software.

Katana ZERO Review

Come for the soundtrack, stay for the rage quits. Here is my Katana ZERO review.

Katana ZERO is a 2D action platformer, a genre that is way out of my gaming comfort zone. If my memory serves me right, the previous 2D platformer I played was Superfrog on the Amiga some time during the 1990s. I suspect that I tend to avoid the genre because if you mess up, your mistake has immediate and disastrous consequences. You usually die, and it’s game over, man! Or at least you have to restart from the previous checkpoint.

In simulation and strategy game games, which are my preferred genres, it’s often possible to mitigate failures. If your star fleet is destroyed, it’s probably not the end of the world universe. You can call in the reserves, or build a new star fleet. And if you somehow managed to mess up a delivery of carbonated black powder Bologna to Bordeaux, there’s always another job you can take.

So how did I come across Katana ZERO? Why, the soundtrack, of course!

The Ultimate Gaming Rig

My gaming rig is 10 years old, and I’m in dire need of a replacement. But what is the ultimate gaming rig?

Every time I buy a new computer, I have to learn everything about hardware and the state of various operating systems all over again. In a series of posts, I’ll got through some of the important things to consider when buying a gaming rig:

  1. Operating system: Windows or Linux?
  2. CPU: Intel or AMD?
  3. Graphics Card: Nvidia or AMD?
  4. Form factor: Laptop or desktop?
  5. Tinkering factor: Parts or pre-assembled?
  6. Sustainability: New or second-hand?
  7. Conclusion: So what’s the ultimate gaming rig setup, then!?

I’ve decided on this specific order of things because decisions taken on the top of the list might limit the available choices later.

In this seventh and final post in the series, we’ll have a look at what I decided in the previous posts and how those decisions describes the ultimate gaming rig.

Gaming Rig Sustainability – New or Second-Hand?

My gaming rig is 10 years old, and I’m in dire need of a replacement. But how much should I care about gaming rig sustainability?

Every time I buy a new computer, I have to learn everything about hardware and the state of various operating systems all over again. In a series of posts, I’ll got through some of the important things to consider when buying a gaming rig:

  1. Operating system: Windows or Linux?
  2. CPU: Intel or AMD?
  3. Graphics Card: Nvidia or AMD?
  4. Form factor: Laptop or desktop?
  5. Tinkering factor: Parts or pre-assembled?
  6. Sustainability: New or second-hand?
  7. Conclusion: So what’s the ultimate gaming rig setup, then!?

I’ve decided on this specific order of things because decisions taken on the top of the list might limit the available choices later.

This sixth post is about how much I should care about gaming rig sustainability. Should I purchase everything brand new, or is second-hand the way to go?