Vegard Skjefstad

www.vegard.net

Menu Close

Tag: Kickstarter (page 1 of 5)

Do You Even Understand How Crowdfunding Works?

So you think you understand how crowdfunding works? Spoiler alert: You don’t. Now let me enlighten you so you don’t look like a dumb-ass.

Crowdfunding is a brilliant way for individuals and companies to raise money for a project they want to get going. Not everyone can – or will – go the venture capitalist route, and for them, sites like Kickstarter is an alternative way to fund their adventures.

The Kickstarter posts I’ve published over the last year have been exclusively about the dark side of crowdfunding. They have told the stories about game development campaigns that have either failed miserably, or are long overdue on their estimated delivery dates.

Although it might very well look like it, I’m not trying to shame anyone (too much) in these posts. Software projects are incredibly complex endeavors, and getting everything you promised delivered on time is basically impossible1.

In this post, however, I’ll do something a little different. I won’t focus on the crowdfunding campaigns themselves. Instead, we’ll turn the spotlight the people pledging to them. A lot of these people don’t seem to understand how crowdfunding actually works, and it’s really grinding my gears!

Read more

Kickstarter: Even More Long Overdue!

Let me tell you the story of two Kickstarter campaigns that are taking their sweet time to deliver on their promises.

Since we last spoke, I’ve been throwing a little more money at Kickstarter campaigns. Despite the fact that the projects I’m pledging to fail left and right, I just don’t learn, do I? My most recent backing was €10 to Superego, a pixel art adventure game calling itself “la primera aventura gráfica documental”.

Yes, that’s Spanish, a language in which my proficiency is limited to ordering a beer. All together now: “un særvesa, pårr favår”! According to Yandex, “la primera aventura gráfica documental” translates into “the first documentary graphic adventure”. As it turns out, Superego is a game based on the life of its creator, Héctor Bometón. And based on the header image of the campaign, he lives a very interesting life. So interesting, in fact, I used the image in this post to grab people’s attention. Sorry about that Héctor.

But this post isn’t about a Kickstarter campaign that may result in me playing a Spanish documentary graphic adventure. This post is about some of the Kickstarter campaigns I’ve pledged to that are long overdue on delivering on their promises.

Read more

WTF Happened To The Superbook?

The Superbook promised to be a technological masterpiece that would turn your smartphone into a laptop. But WTF happened to it?

The Superbook was revealed back in 2016. In a very successful Kickstarter campaign, creator Andromium Inc. showed a device that could turn your Android smartphone into a laptop for as low as $85. The idea was simple: Install Andromium’s custom launcher on your smartphone, connect it to the physical Superbook shell via USB and voila! Your phone is now a fully working laptop.

Despite renowned tech manufacturer ASUS’ repeated failed attempts to achieve the same1, people obviously have bad short-term memory. When the campaign ended on August 20, 2016, 16,732 backers had pledged $2,952,508 to Andromium Inc.

Then, in classic Kickstarter fashion, the waiting started.

Read more

Kickstarter: The Long Overdue

In the world of Kickstarter, you win some and you lose some. And you wait some.

I’m not pledging to support Kickstarter campaigns at the same rate as I once did. But I still throw a bit of money at the odd project. So far in 2019, I’ve supported two video games, Lunark and Space Haven, and a comic, the fifth issue of Dunce. The Dunce pledge is a bit out of character for me, my modus operandi is computer game pledges. But the autobiographic Dunce comic is created by a Norwegian artist, Jens K. Styve, and I’m all for supporting local talent. That the strip is quite entertaining also helps, of course. When I’m writing this, there is still a couple of weeks left of the Dunce campaign. So why don’t you go pledge yourself?

But I digress, as I often do. This post is not supposed to be about the campaigns I’ve supported recently. It’s about two projects I supported a long time ago.

Read more

Limit Theory Development Ends

After 6 grueling years, Josh finally admits defeat, and pulls the plug in Limit Theory.

In 2012, Josh Parnell had a vision: Limit Theory, an open-world space simulator, a sandbox game with no restrictions. In the beautiful, procedurally generated universe, players could explore, trade, pirate, mine, escort, hunt, defend, build, and more.

To finance Limit Theory, Josh did what many indie developers did in 2012. He launched a Kickstarter campaign. With great screenshots, amazing videos, and his unprecedented enthusiasm, Josh managed to raise a grand total of $187,865 from 5,449 backers. I was one of them, and I even covered the game on this site. The campaign was a success, and he now had the means to focus on Limit Theory without having to worry about money.

The game was a massive undertaking, with an enormous scope. Josh was a computer graphics student at the time, but that didn’t stop him from working 40 hours a week on Limit Theory. Unlike many other Kickstarter projects, he also engaged with his audience regularly, and somehow found the time post regular video updates on YouTube.

The game was originally slated for release in 2014, just two years after the Kickstarter campaign ended. It became obvious early on that the planned release date was not even remotely realistic. Limit Theory had the scope of No Man’s Sky – sans multiplayer – and it kept changing slightly. Josh, being a perfectionist, seemed to find it hard to actually finish a particular feature, and move on to the next. On top of that, he would not only develop the game’s features, he would also develop game’s engine from scratch.

Read more

Copyright © 2000-2019 www.vegard.net | Privacy Policy | Statement of Audience | Hosted on vbox4.vbox-host.com